Moor was Often Used to Describe Someone of African Descent who was Black who was Believed to have Come From Ethiopia or Mauritania

Moor was Often Used to Describe Someone of African Descent who was Black who was Believed to have Come From Ethiopia or Mauritania

Source: The sultana and her sisters: black women in the British Isles before 1530 (Women's History Review) 2006 A.D. From the source, "Black women exerted a cultural presence through their recognition inMiddle English and late medieval Scottish vernaculars. Although OldEnglish offers us little more than the word blacche (with its variant regionalspellings) for a black person [15], by the thirteenth century, Middle Englishhad acquired two key terms with which to signal non-white skin colour;More and Saracen. Each has variant regional spellings and neither isgender-specific, as both were applied equally to men and women. A third andrarer word was Sowdonesse (in…
Read More
Cultic Masks in the Ancient Near East (ANE)

Cultic Masks in the Ancient Near East (ANE)

Source: Das Uberleben Der Kanaanischen Kultur In Schwarzafrika: Totenkultbunde Bei Den Yoruba Und In Ugarit (Dipartimento di Studi storico-religiosi dell'Universita' di Roma La Sapienza) 2006 A.D. Note: Page 306 of the source. This source confirms that cultic masks were used in the ancient near east (ANE). This ties to ancient Israelites using cultic masks because we believe the Yoruba are a part of of ancient Israel. There are various groups throughout Africa who utilize masks for various reasons, so this information could be used to suggest migration from the ancient near east into Africa or a shared link between Africa…
Read More
The Mune of West Africa was the Ark of the Covenant in Ancient Israel

The Mune of West Africa was the Ark of the Covenant in Ancient Israel

Source: The Mune Symbol as the Ark of the Covenant between Duguwa and Sefuwa (Borno Museum Society Newsletter) 2006 A.D. Note: Page 15 of the source. Note: Page 16 of the source. Note: Page 16 of the source. Note: Page 17 of the source. Note: Page 18 of the source. Note: Page 19 of the source. Note: Page 19 of the source. Note: Page 20 of the source. Note: Page 20 of the source. Note: Page 21 of the source. Note: Page 22 of the source. Note: Page 22 of the source. Note: Page 23 of the source. Note: Page…
Read More
15th Century Leo Africanus’ Commentary About Jews in Africa

15th Century Leo Africanus’ Commentary About Jews in Africa

Source: Genetics, Mass Media and Identity: A Case Study of the Genetic Research on the Lemba (Routledge) 2006 A.D. Note: Page 46 of the source. Note: Page 46 of the source. Note: Page 47 of the source. Note: Page 88 of the source. On pages 45 through 47, John Pory, the translater of the English edition of Leo Africanus' Description of Africa, noted that the land of the Hebrews was under the equinoctial or equator between Abassin and Congo. Page 88 and 46 of the book names the Ashanti, Hausa, Zulu, Masai, Xhosa, Hottentots, Tutsis, Ashanti, Lemba, Yoruba, and Buganda…
Read More
Labelle Prussin’s JSTOR Article Titled “Judaic Threads In West African Tapestry” Makes Parallels Between West Africa and The Ancient Near East (ANE)-Metallurgy-“Exotic” Caste Systems-“Exotic” Tapestry-“Exotic” Embroidery-Association of The Mystical With Writing and Numbers

Labelle Prussin’s JSTOR Article Titled “Judaic Threads In West African Tapestry” Makes Parallels Between West Africa and The Ancient Near East (ANE)-Metallurgy-“Exotic” Caste Systems-“Exotic” Tapestry-“Exotic” Embroidery-Association of The Mystical With Writing and Numbers

Source: Judaic Threads in the West African Tapestry: No More Foreever? (CAA) 2006 A.D. Note: Page 333 of the source. Note: Page 333 of the source. Note: Page 333 of the source. Note: Page 333 of the source. Note: Page 334 of the source. Note: Page 334 of the source. Note: Page 334 of the source. Note: Page 335 of the source. Note: Page 335 of the source. Note: Page 335 of the source. Note: Page 335 of the source. Note: Page 335 of the source. Note: Page 335 of the source. Note: Page 336 of the source. Note: Page…
Read More