Christian

Love God and Love People

Love God and Love People

The most important thing in this life is to love God and love people (Mark 12:28-31)
Read More
In 1523 A.D. , it was Believed that Black and Red Jews in Africa were Poised To Reclaim Jerusalem

In 1523 A.D. , it was Believed that Black and Red Jews in Africa were Poised To Reclaim Jerusalem

Source: Hybrid Hate, Conflations of Antisemitism & Anti-Black Racism from the Renaissance to the Third Reich (Oxford University Press) 2020 A.D. From the source, " Blacks and Jews in the Western Imaginaire Attempts to account for human difference almost always positioned blacks and Jews outside the normative human frame, as we have seen in the case of Bruno, Vanini, La Peyrère, Kames, Voltaire, and many others, and this fact forms part of the etiology of the sickness of anti-black racism and Jew hatred. As far as blacks were concerned, color itself, the most obvious of human differences, played a major…
Read More
Moor was Often Used to Describe Someone of African Descent who was Black who was Believed to have Come From Ethiopia or Mauritania

Moor was Often Used to Describe Someone of African Descent who was Black who was Believed to have Come From Ethiopia or Mauritania

Source: The sultana and her sisters: black women in the British Isles before 1530 (Women's History Review) 2006 A.D. From the source, "Black women exerted a cultural presence through their recognition inMiddle English and late medieval Scottish vernaculars. Although OldEnglish offers us little more than the word blacche (with its variant regionalspellings) for a black person [15], by the thirteenth century, Middle Englishhad acquired two key terms with which to signal non-white skin colour;More and Saracen. Each has variant regional spellings and neither isgender-specific, as both were applied equally to men and women. A third andrarer word was Sowdonesse (in…
Read More
14th Century “The Travels of Sir John Mandeville” – Nubian Christians are Black as  Moors

14th Century “The Travels of Sir John Mandeville” – Nubian Christians are Black as Moors

Source: THE TRAVELS OF SIR JOHN MANDEVILLE (The Project Gutenberg) 14th Century A.D. From the source, "And men of Nubia be Christian, but they be black as the Moors for great heat of the sun." This source confirms the physical blackness of the medieval Moors once again.
Read More
Enslaved Peoples in Latin America were Practicing Monotheism and Egalitarianism

Enslaved Peoples in Latin America were Practicing Monotheism and Egalitarianism

Source: History of Modern Latin America 1800 to the Present (Wiley) 2010 A.D. Note: Page 61 of the source. Note: Page 62 of the source. Note: Page 62 of the source. This source confirms that enslaved peoples were practicing Judeo-Christian and pagan practices that were associated with Israelites such such as monotheism (worshipping the Supreme Being), ancestor worship, use of sorcery, and egalitarianism.
Read More
Enslaved Peoples were Practicing Judeo-Christian Beliefs

Enslaved Peoples were Practicing Judeo-Christian Beliefs

Source: Encyclopedia of African American Religions (Taylor & Francis) 2013 A.D. Note: Page 200 of the source. This source confirms yet again that enslaved peoples were practicing Judeo-Christian beliefs in West Africa which allowed them to transition relatively easily into evangelical Christianity. From worshipping the Supreme Being to believing in the Afterlife to to be a place in evil suffers and good triumphs are rooted in the biblical understanding of Heaven and Hell. Believing that kinship line will continue into Heaven (Revelation 7:1-9 points to one's salvation and ethnicity being eternal) can be argued that it is seen in the…
Read More
Africans were Practicing Judeo-Christian Beliefs Before Being Enslaved

Africans were Practicing Judeo-Christian Beliefs Before Being Enslaved

Source: Black song: the forge and the flame; the story of how the Afro-American spiritual was hammered out (New York, Macmillan) 1972 A.D. Note: Page 30 of the source. Note: Page 31 of the source. Note: Page 31 of the source. Note: Page 32 of the source. This source confirms that different African peoples like the Mandingos have been practicing Judeo-Christian beliefs such as monotheism and the belief in the "son of the High God" long before converting to evangelical Christianity on mass.
Read More
Judeo-Christian Practices of Enslaved Peoples In America

Judeo-Christian Practices of Enslaved Peoples In America

Source: African-American Christianity: Essays in History (University of California Press) 1994 A.D. Note: Page 83 of the source. Note: Page 83 of the source. Note: Page 83 of the source. This source confirms yet again that West African people groups and enslaved people in America practice Judeo-Christian beliefs such as monotheism and the egalitarianism. This text also shows us that West Africa people groups practiced the worship of female goddesses just as some ancient Israelites did (1 Kings 18:19 and 2 Chronicles 15:16).
Read More
Religious Heritage of Enslaved Peoples

Religious Heritage of Enslaved Peoples

Source: Black Fire One Hundred Years of African American Pentecostalism (InterVarsity Press) 2011 A.D. Note: Page 32 of the source. Note: Page 32 of the source. Note: Page 32 of the source. This source confirms much of what we have noted about that Supreme Being of West Africa having many of the characteristics attributed to Yahweh of the Old Testament. This source confirms that enslaved peoples were practicing Judeo-Christian values before mass conversion to formal Christianity.
Read More
Girgashites (“Sons of Africa”) are Associated with Founding of Carthage

Girgashites (“Sons of Africa”) are Associated with Founding of Carthage

Source: Africa (Jewish Encyclopedia) 1906 A.D. From the source, "  The Septuagint, a recognized authority in Egyptianmatters, Josephus, and Jerome, all interpret Phut as referring to Libya (Dillmann, "Die Genesis," p. 178), from which it may be assumed that the Biblical writers included in their perspective also that great expanse of territory west of Egypt called Libya, by which name ancient writers often designate the whole of Africa. Authors like Herodotus were unacquainted with any African countries to the west of Libya. Some, indeed, have endeavored to explain the Biblical Havilah as an African region; and Josephus ("Ant." i. 6,…
Read More