Met Museum

West Asiatic Soldiers Being Defeated in Egyptian New Kingdom Era

West Asiatic Soldiers Being Defeated in Egyptian New Kingdom Era

Source: Block from a Relief Depicting a Battle (Met Museum of Art) 2021 A.D. Note: From the source. From the source, "Builders reused this painted relief block in the foundation of Ramesses IV's mortuary temple, subsequently excavated by the Metropolitan Museum. In the relief, western Asian soldiers are shown being trampled under the horses that pull the royal chariot, signaling the foreigners' defeat in battle by the might of the Egyptian pharaoh. " This source confirms that Asiatic peoples came in varying shades of brown skin.
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Depiction of Nubians Presenting Tribute to the King

Depiction of Nubians Presenting Tribute to the King

Source: Nubian Tribute Presented to the King, Tomb of Huy (Met Museum) original ca. 1353–1327 B.C. Note: From the source. Note: From the source. Note: From the source. Note: From the source. Note: From the source. Note: From the source. This source confirms yet again that both Nubians and Egyptians, both being Hamitic peoples who were related, came in different shades of brown and black.
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The Phoenicians Travelled to Britain

The Phoenicians Travelled to Britain

Source: The Phoenicians (1500–300 B.C.) | Essay | The Metropolitan Museum of Art | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History (Met Museum) 2004 A.D. From the source, "By the late eighth century B.C., the Phoenicians, alongside the Greeks, had founded trading posts around the entire Mediterranean and excavations of many of these centers have added significantly to our understanding of Phoenician culture. Sea traders from Phoenicia and Carthage (a Phoenician colony traditionally founded in 814 B.C.) even ventured beyond the Strait of Gibraltar as far as Britain in search of tin. However, much of our knowledge about the Phoenicians during the…
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