Flavius Josephus Recorded that Queen of Sheba was Queen of Egypt and Ethiopia

Flavius Josephus Recorded that Queen of Sheba was Queen of Egypt and Ethiopia

Source: SHEBA, QUEEN OF (Jewish Encyclopedia) 1906 A.D. From the source, "The Queen of Sheba, hearing of the wisdom and wealth of Solomon, visited him at Jerusalem, accompanied by a brilliant retinue. There she found that his fame, great as it was, fell far short of the truth, and after exchanging costly presents with him, she returned to her own land, marveling at what she had seen and heard (I Kings x. 1-13). According to Josephus, she was the queen of Egypt and Ethiopia, and brought to Palestine the first specimens of the balsam, which grew in the Holy Land…
Read More
Jews Are Further West than Carthage

Jews Are Further West than Carthage

Source: CARTHAGE (Jewish Encyclopedia) 1906 A.D. From the source, "  The city, called   ("New City") in native inscriptions (Lidzbarski, "Nordsemitische Epigraphik," i. 365), is mentioned in Jewish writings since Talmudic times only as   ("Ḳarthigini"), a name equivalent to the Byzantine form Kαρϑαγένη and in agreement with the Syriac (Payne Smith, "Thes. Syr." cols. 3744, 3765), the Greek form Kαρχηδών being found with the latter. Notwithstanding the peculiar form, perhaps chosen with reference to the founder Dido ( + γυνή, "Woman-City"), the Hebrew word certainly designates Carthage in Africa, not Cartagena in Spain... Although Carthage is not mentioned in the Bible,…
Read More
Girgashites (“Sons of Africa”) are Associated with Founding of Carthage

Girgashites (“Sons of Africa”) are Associated with Founding of Carthage

Source: Africa (Jewish Encyclopedia) 1906 A.D. From the source, "  The Septuagint, a recognized authority in Egyptianmatters, Josephus, and Jerome, all interpret Phut as referring to Libya (Dillmann, "Die Genesis," p. 178), from which it may be assumed that the Biblical writers included in their perspective also that great expanse of territory west of Egypt called Libya, by which name ancient writers often designate the whole of Africa. Authors like Herodotus were unacquainted with any African countries to the west of Libya. Some, indeed, have endeavored to explain the Biblical Havilah as an African region; and Josephus ("Ant." i. 6,…
Read More
In Proto-Shemitic-Hamitic Peoples, Descent was Traced Through the Mother-Female Divinity Worship

In Proto-Shemitic-Hamitic Peoples, Descent was Traced Through the Mother-Female Divinity Worship

Source: SEMITES (originally Shemites) (Jewish Encyclopedia) 1906 A.D. From the source, "Formerly, on account of certain animal names common to all the Semitic tongues, it was held by Hommel and others that the Semites separated from the Aryans in the high table-lands of Turkestan and wandered to Babylonia, whence they spread over the Arabian Peninsula and Syria. This view is now generally abandoned, most scholars agreeing that Arabia was the cradle-land of the Semites, while North Africa was that of the united Hamito-Semitic race, and that the Semites in prehistoric times separated from their kinsmen and migrated to Arabia, where…
Read More
Potential Evidence that Ancestor Worship Existed in Ancient Israel-Ancestor Worship is Prevalent in Some African Peoples

Potential Evidence that Ancestor Worship Existed in Ancient Israel-Ancestor Worship is Prevalent in Some African Peoples

Source: ANCESTOR WORSHIP (Jewish Encyclopedia) 1906 A.D. From the source, " The same homage and adoration paid to deceased parents and more remote ancestors as usually given to deities. Many anthropologists are of opinion that this was the original form of religion (H. Spencer, Lippert); the school represented by Stade and F. Schwally argues that it was the original religion of Israel before Jahvism was introduced by Moses and the Prophets. According to them, much of the priestly legislation was directed against the rites connected with Ancestor Worship. At present the view that the original religion of the Israelites was…
Read More
Evidence for the Existence of Totem, Animism, Tattoo, Ancestor Worship, and Animal Worship Culture in the Ancient Near East

Evidence for the Existence of Totem, Animism, Tattoo, Ancestor Worship, and Animal Worship Culture in the Ancient Near East

Source: Totemism (Jewish Encyclopedia) 1906 A.D. From the source, " A primitive social system in which members of a clan reckoned kinship through their mothers, and worshiped some animal or plant which they regarded as their ancestor and the image of which they bore tattooed on their persons. It was suggested by J. S. Maclennan (in "The Fortnightly Review," 1870, i. 207) that this system existed among the early Hebrews; and his view was taken up by Robertson Smith (in "The Journal of Philology," 1880), who based his theories upon the researches of J. G. Frazer on totemism. Robertson Smith…
Read More