This Video Was Not Made For African Americans – Source List

This Video Was Not Made For African Americans – Source List

This is the list of sources for the following video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IOQPmCNcH1Q Full Source List African Americans (wikipedia)The Origin of African American (Yale)Sermon On The Capture of Lord Cornwallis (Harvard)Sons of Noah Map1644 Africa Map (Princeton)1710 Africa Map (Princeton)1747 Africa Map (Library of Congress)1766 Africa Map (Yale)1794 Africa Map (Library of Congress)1930 Africa Map (Archive.org)A New Voyage To Guinea (1745)West African Countries and Peoples (1868)Bulletin Societe (1890)The Encyclopedia of Missions (1891)A Mission To Gelele, King of Dahomey (1893)Among The Ibos of Nigeria (1921)Memorandum To The President (1969)Blacks Jews The Religious Challenge (1987)
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1749 – Negroes From Whydah Were Considered The Best Slaves For Working The Sugar Plantations

1749 – Negroes From Whydah Were Considered The Best Slaves For Working The Sugar Plantations

Source: The Alarm-Bell: Or, Considerations on the Present Dangerous State of the Sugar Colonies (The British Library) 1749 - pg. 8 Query III Why are the Negroes from the Gold Coast and Whydah the most valuable, and so necessary for the subsistence of sugar plantations? Answer Gold Coast and Whydah Negroes are hard, and are enured to labour in their own country; and will go to the hard work necessary in sugar plantations, as soon as they are purchased by the planters; which is not the case with other Negroes from Angola, Calabar, and other parts of Africa, who live…
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1893 – 115 Towns In Dahomey Belonged to The Tribe of Judah

1893 – 115 Towns In Dahomey Belonged to The Tribe of Judah

Source: A Mission to Gelele, King of Dahome: With Notices of the So Called "Amazons," the Grand Customs, the Yearly Customs, the Human Sacrifices, the Present State of the Slave Trade, and the Negro's Place in Nature, Volumes 1-2 (Michigan State University) 1893 A.D. The eye dwells with delight upon the numerous country villages, like the 115 towns of the Tribe of Judah , and upon the thin forest of palms rising from the tapestry of herbage, here waving, there cut short, which combine to make this spot the Fridaus or Paradise of Dahome-land (Dahomey).
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1741 – The Price of Negro Slaves In West Africa

1741 – The Price of Negro Slaves In West Africa

Source: The London Magazine, and Monthly Chronologer (Princeton University) 1741 - pg. 509-510 Excerpt From Page 509 Cowries, a certain type of seashell is used for money in parts of Asia and Africa. Cowrie (cowry) shells used for decorating apparels, making necklaces and playing dice games. Excerpt From Page 510 In 1740 2,400 Cowries were equal to 1 Rupee. Cowries are valued in West Africa, but specifically Guinea, as much as silver and Gold. There they are called "bougies". Cowries are worn as ornaments in necklaces and bracelets. Cowries are described as white. French merchants in Whydah paid 40 pounds…
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1862 – 2,500 Slaves Shipped From Whydah In Six Weeks

1862 – 2,500 Slaves Shipped From Whydah In Six Weeks

Source: Parliamentary Papers (Great Britain Parliament House of Commons) 1862 AD - pg. 68 "The Alecto hove up for Lagos to meet the mail. I learn from Commander Raby, who is a very active office, and of considerable knowledge in Coast matters, that the Slave Trade is now at its full height at Whydah: legal trade is completely stopped, and they allow no intercourse with men-of-war." "The slavers come down the coast under the American flag, and lay off the place, making their arrangements under their noses, and as soon as the cruizers leave for Lagos, they ship their slaves…
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1862 – 1,000 Slaves Collected At Whydah – Parliamentary Papers

1862 – 1,000 Slaves Collected At Whydah – Parliamentary Papers

Source: Parliamentary Papers (Great Britain Parliament House of Commons) 1862 AD - pg. 5 "With regard to the Slave Trade in the Bights, I have heard that, subsequent to the taking of Porto Novo, the King of Dahomey had collected 1,000 slaves at Whydah: that part of the station has, however, been vigilantly watched by our cruizers, and with the exception of a vessel which escaped with a cargo of slaves from the neighbourhood of Whydah in April last, I have not heard of any slaves having been carried away from the Bights of Benin and Biafra.
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In 1874 A.D. , Whydah Traded with the Barbary Coast and Moors

In 1874 A.D. , Whydah Traded with the Barbary Coast and Moors

Source: Ocean Highways The Geographical Review Volume 1 (National Library of the Netherlands) 1874 A.D. Note: Page 456 of the source Note: Page 456 of the source. This source is important because it helps to paint a picture that Ashanti were an extremely active people. They were not just operating in West Africa, but they also had ties in the northern regions of Africa which were at times known as the Barbary Coast. This post should help individuals maintain the idea that it is entirely possible for a group of people to move from the northern regions of Africa to…
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1820 A.D. – Yahoodie (Whydah) In West Africa is Reported to Be Inhabited By One of the Lost Tribes

1820 A.D. – Yahoodie (Whydah) In West Africa is Reported to Be Inhabited By One of the Lost Tribes

Source: An Account of Timbuctoo and Housa Territories in the Interior of Africa (Good Press) 1820 A.D. Note: From the source. This source confirms that Yahoodi means Jew and Yahooda means Judah. This source confirms that the tribe of Judah is on West Africa.
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1670 – The Worship of One God And Mosaic Laws Were In Negroland Before Christianity or Islam Arrived

1670 – The Worship of One God And Mosaic Laws Were In Negroland Before Christianity or Islam Arrived

Source: Africa being an accurate description of the regions of Ægypt, Barbary, Lybia, and Billedulgerid, the land of Negroes, Guinee, Æthiopia and the Abyssines : with all the adjacent islands, either in the Mediterranean, Atlantick, Southern or Oriental Sea, belonging thereunto : with the several denominations fo their coasts, harbors, creeks, rivers, lakes, cities, towns, castles, and villages, their customs, modes and manners, languages, religions and inexhaustible treasure : with their governments and policy, variety of trade and barter : and also of their wonderful plants, beasts, birds and serpents : collected and translated from most authentick authors and augmented…
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