West Africa

1749 – Negroes From Whydah Were Considered The Best Slaves For Working The Sugar Plantations

1749 – Negroes From Whydah Were Considered The Best Slaves For Working The Sugar Plantations

Source: The Alarm-Bell: Or, Considerations on the Present Dangerous State of the Sugar Colonies (The British Library) 1749 - pg. 8 Query III Why are the Negroes from the Gold Coast and Whydah the most valuable, and so necessary for the subsistence of sugar plantations? Answer Gold Coast and Whydah Negroes are hard, and are enured to labour in their own country; and will go to the hard work necessary in sugar plantations, as soon as they are purchased by the planters; which is not the case with other Negroes from Angola, Calabar, and other parts of Africa, who live…
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A Large Community of Black Jews Lived In Dahomey After WWI

A Large Community of Black Jews Lived In Dahomey After WWI

Source: Blacks Jews The Religious Challenge (Cambridge University Press) 1987, pg. 232 "Closer to our time Dr. J. Krepel noted some time after the First World War, that a large community of Black Jews existed in the interior of Dahomey. These Jews had the five books of Moses written on old parchment in Hebrew."
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1930 Map of Jewish Communities All Over Africa

1930 Map of Jewish Communities All Over Africa

Source: The Lost Tribes A Myth Suggestions Towards Rewriting Hebrew History (Allen H Godbey) 1930 - pg. 266 This map shows the location of Jewish / Israelite communities scattered all over Africa.
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In 1893 AD , 115 Towns in West Africa Belonged to The Tribe of Judah

In 1893 AD , 115 Towns in West Africa Belonged to The Tribe of Judah

Source: A Mission to Gelele, King of Dahome: With Notices of the So Called "Amazons," the Grand Customs, the Yearly Customs, the Human Sacrifices, the Present State of the Slave Trade, and the Negro's Place in Nature, Volumes 1-2 (Michigan State University) 1893 A.D. Note: Page 191 of the A Mission to Gelele source. This source confirms that the tribe of Judah on the West Coast of Africa held sway over a significant amount of towns.
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1741 – The Price of Negro Slaves In West Africa

1741 – The Price of Negro Slaves In West Africa

Source: The London Magazine, and Monthly Chronologer (Princeton University) 1741 - pg. 509-510 Excerpt From Page 509 Cowries, a certain type of seashell is used for money in parts of Asia and Africa. Cowrie (cowry) shells used for decorating apparels, making necklaces and playing dice games. Excerpt From Page 510 In 1740 2,400 Cowries were equal to 1 Rupee. Cowries are valued in West Africa, but specifically Guinea, as much as silver and Gold. There they are called "bougies". Cowries are worn as ornaments in necklaces and bracelets. Cowries are described as white. French merchants in Whydah paid 40 pounds…
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1862 – 2,500 Slaves Shipped From Whydah In Six Weeks

1862 – 2,500 Slaves Shipped From Whydah In Six Weeks

Source: Parliamentary Papers (Great Britain Parliament House of Commons) 1862 AD - pg. 68 "The Alecto hove up for Lagos to meet the mail. I learn from Commander Raby, who is a very active office, and of considerable knowledge in Coast matters, that the Slave Trade is now at its full height at Whydah: legal trade is completely stopped, and they allow no intercourse with men-of-war." "The slavers come down the coast under the American flag, and lay off the place, making their arrangements under their noses, and as soon as the cruizers leave for Lagos, they ship their slaves…
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1862 – 1,000 Slaves Collected At Whydah – Parliamentary Papers

1862 – 1,000 Slaves Collected At Whydah – Parliamentary Papers

Source: Parliamentary Papers (Great Britain Parliament House of Commons) 1862 AD - pg. 5 "With regard to the Slave Trade in the Bights, I have heard that, subsequent to the taking of Porto Novo, the King of Dahomey had collected 1,000 slaves at Whydah: that part of the station has, however, been vigilantly watched by our cruizers, and with the exception of a vessel which escaped with a cargo of slaves from the neighbourhood of Whydah in April last, I have not heard of any slaves having been carried away from the Bights of Benin and Biafra.
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Medieval West, North, and East Africa was Highly Connected

Medieval West, North, and East Africa was Highly Connected

Source: Gold Road Trade Routes Map (Howard University) 2021 A.D. Note: From the source. This source completely dispels the myths that "medieval West Africa was not connected to North Africa...". This source destroys the artificial barrier that has been erected to divide "sub-Saharan" Africa from "North Africa".
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In 1874 A.D. , Whydah Traded with the Barbary Coast and Moors

In 1874 A.D. , Whydah Traded with the Barbary Coast and Moors

Source: Ocean Highways The Geographical Review Volume 1 (National Library of the Netherlands) 1874 A.D. Note: Page 456 of the source Note: Page 456 of the source. This source is important because it helps to paint a picture that Ashanti were an extremely active people. They were not just operating in West Africa, but they also had ties in the northern regions of Africa which were at times known as the Barbary Coast. This post should help individuals maintain the idea that it is entirely possible for a group of people to move from the northern regions of Africa to…
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Ancient and Medieval Gao was Connected to North African Coastal Cities

Ancient and Medieval Gao was Connected to North African Coastal Cities

Source: Discovery of the earliest royal palace in Gao and its implications for the history of West Africa (Open Edition Journals) 2012 A.D. From the Discovery source, "The history of Gao has been reconstructed mainly on the basis of the two Tarikhs of Timbuktu. The early days of Gao, however, which were not described conscientiously in these Tarikhs, have been subjected to polemics in many respects. Our excavations in the archaeological sites of Gao Saney and Gao city since 2001 have provided new data that offer an original approach for rewriting the early history of Gao. According to these data, the archaeological site…
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